Archive for the ‘Nokia’ Category

microsoft_surface_phone_8_by_yronimus-d54trfa

The current rumor going around is that Microsoft is going to rename their Surface tablets as Lumia’s.

I don’t know if this is indeed going to happen and if so, when and for what reasons, but this is what I could see happening going forward.

First, it is very difficult to trademark a name or brand in one country, let alone trademark one on a worldwide basis.  Look no further way than last year when Microsoft was forced to rename their cloud storage service, SkyDrive to OneDrive because Sky TV fought in court that the name SkyDrive belonged to them, and or it would confuse their customer base.

We can also go back to Microsoft naming their new tablet PC products as “Surface.”  Surface is a trademark held by Microsoft and used for their tabletop computers with 4 foot touch screens.  But that all changed when Microsoft surprised the world with their Surface and Surface Pro tablet PCs.

It was easier for Microsoft to use an existing trademark they already owned and enforced worldwide than create a new name for their first personal computers.   While the Surface computer was well known by news executives and weather-persons at top market news stations and a handful of geeks, the name or word Surface wasn’t used by the every day person on the street.

So, this brings me to 2014 and Microsoft’s acquisition of Nokia.  With Nokia, came the Lumia brand/trademark.  Other than people, it is the one thing we understand that Microsoft got with the purchase of the mobile division. 

As stated above, it is much easier to take an existing brand name you already have trademarked around the globe and reuse it, rather than start again from scratch — that takes time, and Microsoft is nearly out of time.

So loosely, Lumia is already used by Nokia to represent their Windows Phones and ARM based tablet running Windows RT — both platforms use the ARM architecture to power the Lumia devices.

Microsoft’s Surface however, is used for both Windows 8.x tablet PCs running on the Intel x86-64 architecture, such as the initial Surface Pro, Surface Pro 2 and the new Surface Pro 3.  However, Microsoft’s ARM based Surface and Surface 2 run the Windows on ARM variation of Windows 8.x and can run the new Windows 8 apps, but not the Windows “desktop” programs so many expect a Windows PC to run.

To cut out some of the confusion, Microsoft would be smart to leverage the Lumia brand they just acquired from Nokia and apply that brand to all ARM based Windows phones, tablets and personal computers (should the future bring such a PC).

So, could the future of Windows Phone and ARM based Windows be branded as Lumia, while the Surface brand is reserved for x86?  That certainly makes more sense then continuing a loosing battle to market both or Microsoft’s tablet as Pro and “non-Pro.”

ed: look at Samsung, they have “Galaxy” for Android and “ATIV”, a word I still don’t know how to pronounce, still haven’t heard anyone speak in a television commercial and I can’t remember; and they use it as their “brand” all of their Windows Phones, tablets and laptops — no wonder thieir PC sales are down and Lenovo’s PC sales are up (hint: ThinkPad and Yoga)

While analysts and original equipment manufactures are cheering the death of Windows RT and the Surface RT, I think it’s a blessing that these vendors are leaving Windows RT.

This allows Microsoft to develop new and improved products unhindered and free to create.

Microsoft will not have to worry about their (fair-weather) partners complaining that Microsoft has an unfair advantage over them.

Microsoft is now free to create a new generation of products as distinct as the iPad and as advanced as the 41 megapixel Nokia Lumia 1020.

Like they did with the simple addition of an integrated kick stand and revolutionary Touchcover keyboard.

broken-chains_00401670

The new plans from T-Mobile and AT&T which allow customers to upgrade their phones as frequently as every 6 months as it is in T-Mobile’s case or every 12 months in the case of AT&T may just give Micosoft and Nokia new opportunities to not only gain much needed market share, but steal away the very valuable and influential smartphone enthusiasts who crave the cutting edge hardware they crave.

Mac or PC – It’s an Investment

My reasoning is that consumers aren’t married to their smartphone platform in the same way they are for their Windows or OSX based computers and laptop.

When you purchase a laptop or desktop computer, you are making an investment in hardware. Neither Windows of Macs come with productivity software, so the consumer makes additional investments in a word processor, photo editing software, video editing software, software to play DVDs or Blurays.

This is a big investment to make and one that you plan on leveraging for years to come. Upgrade it little by little and very quickly you have, “bought into” the platform you chose.

Smartphones

Up until this summer, Americans “buy a phone” for a discounted rate and are locked into a contract for 24 months – this lock isn’t just for their wireless service, it’s also linked to the smartphone you purchase.

Apps are for the most part free and an “expensive” app or game could cost you $10, but more than likely, if you buy an app it will yt between $2-$3.

Like in the example above, you have now invested in the cost of the phone, you may have purchased some apps, but the investment is very small and I’d argue many people spend much more a at Starbucks in one visit than most people pay for their apps in 6 months.

Smartphone users no longer have the same capital invested in apps and games because they are free or very low cost, they still have the 2 year commitment to the smartphone.

This commitment to one phone, one platform for 24 months is not to be taken likely and I believe that people’s loyalty to their 2 year plan extends to the device they chose and for many people they make the most of it and select the “best phone at the time.”

Next and Jump!

So now we have the plans from AT&T and T-Mobile which allow users to exchange their phone on a more frequent basis and since the users never buy the phone and have to trade it in to get the newest plan they now have the opportunity to get a new phone – a clean slate.

So every 6 or 12 months customers can trade in their current phone for a brand new device. There is a premium for this service, but making a trip to Starbucks once a day is much more costly than these carriers’ premium plans.

So now the 2 year commitment is out of the equation and consumers who choose one of these plans they now have the mindset that they phone they have today will not be the phone they have next month or in the near future.

The shackles are gone

If Nokia and Microsoft and Blackberry for that matter can come out with phone designs that are compelling on a reguar enough basis, keep them current and up to date, the person who has an iPhone, Galaxy or One trades in the phone they have only had for a short period of time, they are free to choose the smartphone with the most “wow factor.”

I could see many people who purchased a high end smartphone from Apple, Samsung or HTC trade and on their 6 or 12 month cycle “try” a phone like the Nokia Lumia 1020 – with its revolutionary 41MP sensor and HD zoom technology.

One of the biggest barriers to switching phones has been removed and in AT&Ts case, after 12 months, they can exchange their year old phone for the latest and greatest with no money down – not even any fees.

What about the App Store?

While I will be the first to say that there are some holes in the Windows Phone 8 Store, most people will never notice – well, maybe after Instagram gets released for Windows Phone, but seriously, there are an abundance of apps in the Store and while there isn’t everything, if consumes switch platforms, the developers will follow their customers to Windows Phone.

Gosh, once users have HERE Drive+, HERE Transit, HERE Maps and discover the built-in and instantly accessible app-like features built into Bing on Windows Phone, they will see the wealth of features available to them and everyone who has a Windows Phone out of the box – it’s really an amazing feeling showing an Android or iPhone users Bing Vision or Bing Music. They go nuts!

Loyalty and Superfans [Disclosure: I am a Microsoft and Nokia superfan]

For every Android, iPhone or Windows Phone 8 superfan out there, there are 30 more who are not loyal to any of the smartphone platforms. These people are heavily influenced by that one friend, co-worker or family member and will then make a purchase based on what these people have.

If Nokia and Microsoft can come out with smartphones with WOW features that people really can relate to and then see the superior results immediately – like with an ultrahigh resolution phone with “zoom later” capabilities, then I believe these people, the non-techy people will be drawn to the “new” Windows Phone platform.

Of course, if Microsoft and Nokia don’t upgrade both the operating system with more features and improve upon not just the phones camera, but evolve beyond the imagination they will get more users leave Android and leave iPhone.

Wrap-up

So while these plans for power users aren’t for everyone, they do allow consumers in the US who are locked to a carrier in 2 year contracts one to three additional times in their contract to trade-in the old for the WOW!

Am I the only one who thinks that BOTH Nokia and Microsoft ( ala Surface) will announce their Windows 8 Phones together?

It makes a lot of sense. No platform or industry can grow and dominate if their are not enough players/products in the market.

You go to buy a car where ALL the car dealers are – no, it’s no coincidence they are all located next to one another.

The same goes for phones. If there are 18 Android phone choices and between 1-4 Windows Phone models available people will give more consideration to buying an Android phone which has more support.

No one wants to be left alone and outside of “the group.” We feel safe in groups and the same applies when you are making a decision on which phone to purchase.

Another thing? Each Android OEM has between 4-12 new phones released every year and then Google updates their OS nearly as often. New phones, combined with perceived or real upgrades is enough to push people towards Android.

Microsoft and yes, Nokia too, need more exposure, more new products and a more frequent and varied release schedule.

Only when there are as many new Windows Phones in the stores and in the news as there are Android phones will Microsoft ‘s superior phone/platform succeed.